Ryan Best, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral researcher

University Research Priority Program "Dynamics of Healthy Aging"

 

Contact

R. Best

 


Ryan Best, Ph.D.
University of Zurich
Department of Psychology
Developmental Psychology: Adulthood
Binzmuehlestrasse 14/11
8050 Zurich / Switzerland
E-Mail:
Room:
best@psychologie.uzh.ch
BIN 3.A.07

Current Research Interests

  • Aging and decision-making
  • Motivation, experience, and self-efficacy
  • Subjective valuation, acceptance, and adoption of technology

Brief Research Statement

Broadly, I am interested in age-related differences in decision processes. My previous work involved a more applied approach to investigate aging and the role of subjective valuation in decision-making related to the use of technology.  Older adults still lag behind their younger counterparts in technology adoption despite potential benefits for functional support, especially in domains such as health care and advanced driver assistance.  My current work employs a more theoretical approach to investigate aging, motivational differences in decision-making, and the effect of domain specific experience and self-efficacy on goal orientation and goal pursuit.

Selected Key Publications

  • Charness, N., Best, R., & Evans, J. (in publication - 2016). Supportive home health care technology for older adults: Attitudes and implementation. Gerontechnology.
  • Best, R., & Charness, N. (2015). Age differences in the effect of framing on risky choice: A meta-analysis. Psychology and Aging, 30, 688-698.
  • Van Houwelingen, C. T. M., Barakat, A., Best, R., Boot, W. R., Charness, N., & Kort, H. S. M. (2015). Dutch nurses’ willingness to use home telehealth: Implications for practice and education. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41, 47-56.
  • Charness, N., Best, R., & Souders, D. J. (2012). Memory function and supportive technology. Gerontechnology, 11, 23-34.
  • Fox, M. C., Ericsson, K. A., & Best, R. (2011). Do procedures for verbal reporting of thinking have to be reactive? A meta-analysis and recommendations for best reporting methods. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 316-344.